Picasso.Blue and Rose

18 September 2018 - 6 January 2019
Musée d'Orsay

The Musée d’Orsay and the Musée national Picasso-Paris are organising an exceptional event dedicated to Pablo Picasso’s blue and rose periods. This exhibition is the first large-scale collaboration between our two museums, allowing us to bring together a number of previously unseen works. It features masterpieces, some of which, such as La Vie (1903, Cleveland Museum of Art), are being presented for the first time in France, and proposes a new interpretation on the years 1900-1906, a critical period in the artist’s career which to date has not been covered in its entirety by a French museum.

The presentation of this exhibition at the Musée d’Orsay demonstrates the desire to analyse the young Picasso within the framework of his era. His different productions have thus been placed within the context of the work of his contemporaries and predecessors, both Spanish and French (Casas, Nonell, Casagemas, Steinlen, Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec and Gauguin), who he was able to directly observe at salons and galleries, and indirectly through reproduction, among other things.

Dorothea lange

16 october- January 2019
Jeu de Paume

The Politics of Seeing features major works by the world famous American photographer Dorothea Lange (1895, Hoboken, New Jersey–1966, San Francisco, California), some of which have never before been exhibited in France. The exhibition focuses on the extraordinary emotional power of Dorothea Lange’s work and on the context of her documentary practice. It features five specific series: the Depression period (1933-1934), a selection of works from the Farm Security Administration (1935-1939), the Japanese American internment (1942), the Richmond shipyards (1942-1944) and a series on a Public defender (1955-1957). Over one hundred splendid vintage prints taken between 1933 and 1957 are enhanced by the presence of documents and screenings broadening the scope of an œuvre often familiar to the public through images such as White Angel Breadline (1933) and Migrant Mother(1936), which are icons of photographic history. The majority of prints in this exhibition belong to the Oakland Museum of California, where Lange’s considerable archive, donated to the museum after her death by her husband Paul Shuster Taylor, is conserved.

Like John Steinbeck’s famous novel The Grapes of Wrath, Dorothea Lange’s œuvre has helped shape our conception of the interwar years in America and contributed to our knowledge of this period. However, this exhibition also introduces other aspects of Dorothea Lange’s practice, which she herself considered archival. By placing the photographic work in the context of her anthropological approach, it enables viewers to appreciate how its power also lies in her capacity to interact with her subjects, evident in her captions to the images. She thereby considerably enriched the informative quality of the visual archive and produced a form of oral history for future generations.

Cubism

The Centre Pompidou takes a fresh look at one of modern art history's founding movements, Cubism (1907-1917), through a comprehensive overview.
17 October- 25 February

The first exhibition devoted to Cubism in France since 1953, the project's originality lies in its unusual stance, broadening a standpoint usually focused on its two inventors, Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, to other artists. These pioneers, soon followed by Fernand Léger and Juan Gris, reserved their ground-breaking experimental work for a small-scale gallery run by a young unknown dealer, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, while artists like Albert Gleizes, Jean Metzinger, Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, Robert and Sonia Delaunay brought the movement to the attention of critics and the public through their contributions to the Paris Salons. The exhibition highlights the rich inventiveness and wide variety of the movement. Not only did it introduce a geometric approach to forms and challenge classical representation, but its radical explorations and the creative drive of its members also paved the way to modern art. Containing 300 works and documents illustrating the influence of Cubism, the exhibition is presented chronologically in fourteen sections. Various masterpieces stand out, like Picasso's Portrait de Gertrude Stein (1906), Ambroise Vollard (1909) and Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (1910) as well as groups of paintings and sculptures never yet seen together. The exhibition circuit highlights Cubism's momentous, multi-faceted development, going back to its primitivist sources and the Cubists' fascination with Gauguin and Cézanne. It also reflects the movement's formal journey from its initial Cézannian period – illustrated here by Picasso's extraordinary still life Pains et compotier sur une table (1909) – to a hermetic, analytical stage (1910-1912), before evolving towards a more synthetic version (1913-1917) with a return to representation and colour.

Zao-Wou-Ki

Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris
10 June-6 January


His work has now achieved the fame it deserves, but the opportunities to appreciate its complexity have been too rare here. This exhibition sets out to consider it in a new light while also inviting the viewer to reflect on the question of large-format paintings.

The exhibition itinerary begins with Zao Wou-Ki's adoption of a new, "abstract" approach – even if he found the term too restrictive – with the 1956 painting titled Traversée des apparences. This decisive step preceded a first stay in the United States, in 1957, that encouraged him in his quest for an ever-larger picture space.

Working at the intersection of several different worlds, Zao left China for Paris in 1948, just as the domain of "living art" was beginning to be divided between France and the United States. His oeuvre traverses the aesthetic debates that accompanied the development of modern art, and while part of a rewarding Paris scene, he was very quick to spot the vitality of American painting; in addition he was gradually returning to certain aspects of Chinese painting that he had previously severed contact with.

Miro

Grand Palais
3 October- 4 February


Bringing together nearly 150 works, this retrospective traces the technical and stylistic evolution of the artist. Miró creates from his dreams and opens the door to his poetic universe.

Miró transformed the world around him with an apparent simplicity of means, whether a symbol, the tracing of a finger or water on paper, a seemingly fragile line on the canvas, a line in the ground fused with fire, or an insignificant object paired with another. He conjured a world full of poetic transformations from these surprising juxtapositions and unusual marriages, restoring enchantment to the world.

“For me, a painting should be like sparks. It should dazzle you like the beauty of a woman or a poem.”

Magnificent Venice

26 september- 21 January 2019
Grand Palais


Having inherited a multisecular tradition, at the dawn of the 18th century Venetian civilisation dazzled in the visual and decorative arts, music and opera alike. The presence of great talents, such as the painters Piazzetta and Giambattista Tiepolo, the urban landscape painter or vedutista Canaletto and the sculptors Corradini and Brustolon, to name but a few, allowed Venice to cultivate a unique aesthetic and sense of luxury. Music was kept very much alive through creations by composers such as Porpora, Hasse and Vivaldi, performed by world-famous singers, including the castrato Farinelli and the soprano Faustina Bordoni.
In the Ospedali, poor or orphaned young girls received extensive musical education, and their virtuosity made them famous throughout Europe. In the city, during Carnival, drama and farce were everywhere, and the passion for gambling was given free reign at the ridotto.





Alphonse Mucha

Musée du Luxembourg
12 september- 27 January

Born in 1860 in the small town of Ivancice, Alphonse Mucha became famous in 1895 in Paris, with Gismonda, his first poster for Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923), the greatest actress of the time. As a poster artist, Mucha developed a very personal style, the "Mucha style", characterised by sinuous forms mixing young women, floral motifs and ornamental lines, as well as a subtle range of pastel shades. This style would soon embody the movement emerging at the time in the decorative arts – Art Nouveau. While he is famous for his posters, Mucha was a versatile artist: painter, sculptor, photographer, decorator and also a valued teacher. During his first trip to the United States in 1904, he was called "the greatest decorative artist in the world". But his political and humanist beliefs led him to gradually give up this decorative style and to undertake cycles of history painting, sometimes in very large format, in a militant and idealistic spirit. Thus, around 1900-1910, he changed and supported resolutely figurative and epic paintings, detached from all the European avant-garde artists. His late works bear witness to his dream of unity among all Slav peoples, notably The Slavic Epic (1912-1926), a cycle composed of twenty monumental paintings. This exhibition traces the career of Mucha and draws the portrait of a complex artist, driven by a social and philosophical vision.